11 Comments

Each of us can help create a 'solution ripple'. At work, encourage others to provide solutions to the problems they raise and recognize their creativity in coming up with solutions. This can come from leaders...it can also come at any level, including brainstorming sessions as groups to come up with solutions. People are sometimes reticent to offer solutions for fear that they will be ridiculed. We can all encourage others by responding with, "Thanks for offering the solution. Let's use that as a starting point and expand on it."

It's not just work where there are opportunities. We can help our children learn to be creative solution providers be asking them how they would solve a problem. It could be a problem they brought up or something that you (the parent) offers up and asks for creative input.

I love this topic. Thank you, Robert, for bringing it to our attention. You are allowing us to provide solutions to the problem of a 'culture of no solutions' haha.

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Sep 1, 2023Liked by Robert Glazer

A great message .

As humans we are bestowed ownership and assigned accountability .

It is sin to abdicate that blessing .

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I like the angle that you used for this. A colleague and I were discussing customer service the other day after both of us had experienced profoundly mediocre results from simple product exchanges. It also brings to mind the 1899 essay by Elbert Hubbard called "Message to Garcia", an enjoyable read which you may know about, or, if you have the time: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Message_to_Garcia

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Sep 1, 2023Liked by Robert Glazer

Great message for a Friday! I am always left "confused" as to why people want to ignore a problem/situation and instead say "lets focus on solution and not the one(s) that make the mistake". I agree a solution needs to be found. Action needs to be taken, as you well mention in this article. However, the lack of accountability or awareness on the part of the person(s) that are responsible for the mistake, and/or the lack of accountability on the part of the team leader, for example, to acknowledge that something did not work, puzzles me. When I make I mistake, I recognize it, apologize, and get to work on fixing it. All at the same time. We have to normalize recognizing that we make mistakes, that we acknowledge when we do and that we will figure out a way to fix it. All three parts.

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Sep 1, 2023Liked by Robert Glazer

Good morning! Great point regarding what makes great customer service. Think of the redemptive value for United if one of the Chicago team had taken the responsibility and initiative to follow through. It surely would have brought some level of appreciation to the customer. United should have trained their employees using Carl Jansen’s concepts in Moment of Truth (showing my age).

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Willing <> able.

David Marquet said it best. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ivwKQqf4ixA

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I understand the Shuster's frustration, but they should have checked to see if the bag was tagged correctly. That would have saved so much time. We put so much responsibility on customer serivce staff these days. We are all human and make mistakes. Most of these people are hourly workers and overworked. Yes, someone should have stepped up, but customers have to realize that we have a responsibility as well. Can you imagine if everyone checked the tags on their checked baggage before they left the counter?

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